Is the Porsche 911 your favourite automotive icon? Read what we think and cast your vote
Andrew Frankel Terminalsecurity
28 February 2019

 

The Porsche 911 is in the running to be this year’s Terminalsecurity Awards Readers’ Champion. Each day a different member of the Terminalsecurity team will champion one of 17 cars, but only one can be the Icon of Icons and it’s up to you to decide - .

Imagine you designed a car so versatile, it was as good to drive as it was easy to live with. 

Imagine that, despite being a street machine, it went on to win all the major sports car races – Daytona, Sebring and Le Mans – not just in its class, but outright. Next add in a hat-trick of Monte Carlo Rally victories and a couple of wins on the Dakar Rally. Imagine this was a car sought out by film stars and racing drivers alike, and a car that was considered the best in its class throughout its life, usually by a frankly embarrassing margin. 

Imagine, finally, that this life was 56 years long. And counting. 

Our Verdict

Porsche 911 road test review - hero front

Wider, more powerful eighth-generation 911 is still eminently fast, and capable at all speeds

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Usually when someone comes up with a new and successful format for a car, it’s not long before everyone else piles in too. Not with the Porsche 911. Rear-engined cars with flat-six motors are not an exclusively Porsche province, but as the last one (the ill-fated Chevrolet Corvair) went out of production 50 years ago, I don’t think that need delay us here. Truth is the configuration was exceptional, providing a sports car with great packaging, a short wheelbase, incredible traction, a ground-hugging centre of gravity and superbly delicate steering. Yes, it had drawbacks, but none as great as was claimed, all capable of being engineered out of existence. 

Why did no one follow it? Because from the off, Porsche did it too damn well and soon the layout became synonymous with the brand. Any attempt to do the same would be free advertising for Porsche.

 

All that explains what made the 911 great, but perhaps it doesn’t completely cover why the concept has survived so long. For that, look at the way the car has been developed: Porsche first tried to replace the 911 in the late 1970s when customers were asking for a more comfortable, user-friendly kind of car. But when that turned out to be something with a water-cooled engine in its nose, it turned out they’d rather have a 911 after all. So they adapted the 911 instead, adding a dizzying array of bodystyles and engine options so that there would be a 911 for everyone, including those only interested in the image a 911 presented to the outside world, and not the way that it drove. 

Which could have been dangerous were it not for the fact that Porsche also took the 911 in the other direction too, particularly in the past 20 years of the GT series cars. And I think the real point lies here: for those of us who love great driving machines, the people who perpetuate the image of cars like the 911, the truth is that Porsche has continued to make 911s that are not simply better than ever, like the new 992, but cars that are greater driving machines too. While almost all other cars have their character diluted over time, the 911’s has become more concentrated. 

So I humbly suggest that the question to answer here is not why you should vote for the 911 ahead of all these other entirely worthy cars – but why on earth you should not.

READ MORE

New 2019 Porsche 911: eighth-generation sports car revealed​

In pictures: the Porsche 911 story​

Porsche 911 review

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Comments
6

28 February 2019

 Any product that is in continuous production for decades is an Icon, People aren’t buying it just because it looks nice, it’s be nurtured, refined into what the current 911 is today a desirable car, a Car that can be used every Day, doesn’t cost seven figures to buy, and doesn’t empty your account every month to run, anything that keeps being improved over decades is an icon, has to be, what else would you describe it as ?

Peter Cavellini.

28 February 2019

Another one of those occasions when I have to whole heartedly agree with Mr. Frankel.

28 February 2019

For a car to be an icon it needs to reach that level of status where it is automatically drawn in pictures, where everyone knows what your talking about when you mention it.

The Land Rover still nudges ahead.

JMax

28 February 2019
The 911 is unquestionably an iconz, with many great examples.

But I strongly disagree with Andrew that the 992 is better than ever.

1 March 2019
The 911 is unquestionably an icon, with many great examples.

But I strongly disagree with Andrew that the 992 is better than ever.

15 March 2019

The basic part of the magnetostrictive is the sensing element called the waveguide. The waveguide is made of ferromagnetic materials such as iron, nickel, cobalt and their alloys. The position magnet which is round in shape moves around this waveguide. Initially when position has to be determined the electronics sends a current pulse called the interrogation pulse through the waveguide and starts the timer . So a magnetic field is created around the waveguide. When the magnetic field of the position magnet interacts with the magnetic file around the waveguide a strain pulse is generated which travels at the speed of on both sides. On one side this strain pulse is detected by the strain pulse detection system and then processed by the electronics and converted into electrical pulse . The position is determined based on the time the strain pulse takes to reach the strain pulse detection system. The un useful pulse which travels opposite the electronics is damped by damping module to prevent any interference by reflections from the waveguide tip.

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