Is the affordable long range EV finally here? We took a Kona Electric on a round trip of almost 700 miles from Oxfordshire to Edinburgh and back to find out
6 January 2019

Hyundai’s Kona Electric 64kWh is an EV I’ve been waiting to try. With an entry level 64kWh price of £32,845, £300 for a Pod Point 7kW home wall box (after grants) it’s real-world money and can potentially do everything a conventional car can do. 

If I owned an EV, I want to do all the usual stuff like 160 mile round trips to the airport and the regular 300 mile run I do to Edinburgh without making allowances. The Kona is equipped with a CCS DC 50kW rapid charging port and an AC port (7kW only) and a charge lead for domestic charging at 10 amps from a household socket.

At the end of November 2018 in chilly but not freezing conditions, I set off one morning from home in North Oxfordshire, to Edinburgh driving a Kona Electric Premium SE (£35,145). The trip read 1872 miles and the sat nav showed 344 miles to go. In theory I should have been able to make my usual (and only) stop at Tebay Services M6 northbound around 200 miles away, but had Lancaster services at around 170 miles in mind as a backup. 

I’d signed up for an Ecotricity account and got the app, which would let me charge at anyone of its Electric Highway charge points. Ecotricity has the exclusive franchise for motorway chargers so if you’re planning a motorway-heavy trip as I was, there’s no other choice of energy provider without leaving the motorway network. Even then, I would be counting on 50kW DC charging rather than AC only and at most stops there’s only one of those available. 

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Plenty of charge points

The Ecotricity charge points are listed in the app and with details of the car logged into the app along with your journey, the app suggests where to stop and charge. There are plenty of charging opportunities on the way, so theoretically all I had to do was make sure I had enough charge left for the 40 mile, charger-free run across the Borders from the M74 at Abington to Edinburgh.

The app was showing the Tebay charger was in use for a full 24 hours before I left so I queried that with Ecotricity support. They said if they couldn’t connect to a charger for any reason, the app would report the last status their servers had logged. So I had no way of confirming the charger was working or not. If the charger was working but offline when I arrived, that meant I wouldn’t be able to pay using the app and would get a free vend. 

For that reason I stopped at Lancaster with 86 miles range remaining, according to the instrument panel. I’d started with 319 miles predicted range, a difference of 233. But I’d only covered 172 miles so with the heater on, cruising at around 70mph and stop-start in road works, there was a discrepancy in the predicted range of 60 miles.

Rapid chargers only fast charge the Kona to 80% battery capacity, then slow to a relative trickle to avoid battery damage. This varies, but is always governed by the car rather than the charger. In this case, assuming you leave home on a full charge, subsequent top ups will only give 80 percent unless you are prepared to wait another hour and a half or so. Assuming you don’t risk dropping below, say, 30 miles range, that reduces available capacity even more. 

The DC charger is rated at 50kW but according to the Lancaster charger was charging at 41kW. Charging is dead easy though. Open the app, scan the bar code on the charger, plug the car in and away it goes. Then go off for breakfast or a coffee or sample the aromatic delights of motorway services toilets.

No happy ending at Gretna

In theory I wouldn’t need to stop again but to be certain I didn’t get stranded in the Borders, I stopped 80 odd miles further on at Gretna. Sustained motorway speeds with the heater on meant that the range, while still OK, was still significantly less than the trip computer was predicting. I arrived at Gretna at 4.10pm with a 139 miles remaining and 90 miles to go, only to find the only Ecotricity CCS DC charger out of order. I still had the option of connecting to the 7kW AC charger but it would be too slow to be of any use.

I pressed on, planning to stop at Abington before the final run across country. It was dark, cold and raining by the then and I was using lights as well as heating. After less than a minute, the charger terminated charging, reporting a ‘vehicle fault.’

I tried a few more times and phoned Ecotricity support who said the charger may be just ‘having a moment’ and to try holding the plug in place while it started charging. That didn’t work so I consulted Zap Map, the website which lists all chargers in the UK, and found there was a Chargeplace Scotland charger in the car park at Abington village a mile away. When I arrived, plugs and cables were lying on the wet ground. I paddled around a bit, and gave it a shot, but the DC charger was also out of order.

I left for the final leg and periodically turned the heater off which made a noticeable difference to the miles per kilowatt display (real time fuel consumption) but I got cold in the process so turned it back on. I swung into the drive at my destination at 8.15pm with around 30 miles range left, energy consumption improving noticeably once I switched from motorways to B-roads. The noisiest thing on the motorway had been tyre noise but otherwise the Kona was comfy, well equipped and serene when cruising but punchy when you need it to be.

New style of driving

On the way, I had some fun with the paddles which let you control the amount of regenerative braking. The feature introduces a new style of driving because set to high regen on normal roads or in stop-start driving, the accelerator doubles as a brake much like the Nissan Leaf E-pedal and you hardly need the energy-squandering conventional brakes at all. On the motorway, Hyundai advise knocking the regen right back, allowing the car to coast when you lift off to help extend the range. That seemed to make sense.

During my stay, the Kona went on charge plugged into a 13amp domestic supply which took around 12 hours to bring the battery to full capacity. That was the only practical choice because there are only about four or five rapid DC chargers in Edinburgh and none are at convenient retail locations. 

On the return trip a couple of days later I planned to stop at Tebay 140 miles away. There’s no Ecotricity point southbound but there is a road link to the Northbound side where I plugged in, again in the pouring rain. The charger dropped out again with the same error message I’d seen at Abington. At that point the Kona had been averaging 3.3 miles/kWh so at that rate, 50kWh of energy from the 64kWh battery would take me 165 miles. 

No bother. Killington Lake services were only 10 miles further on so I stopped there. Same thing though, so I made a call to Hyundai’s PR man who explained there was a problem with a Ecotricity’s software not talking to some BMWs and the Kona and that a rollout of software had been due for a while. In fact, Ecotricity had tweeted the rollout was happening back in September. 

Hyundai recommended getting off the motorway and finding another provider as the problem was specific to Ecotricity. Relieved that it definitely wasn’t the Kona at fault and I could actually get home, I decided to stop at a few more Motorway services to get a sense of how widespread the problem was and headed for Knutsford services further south. Same problem. At Sandbach services, both chargers were completely out of service and covered up so the next stop was Keele. 

I am not alone

Bingo! It worked and I left the Kona to guzzle energy while I forced down yet another flat white coffee. By the time I got home I’d covered 340.3 miles that day, at an average of 3.5 miles/kWh. 290 miles of that was at motorway speed, driving the Kona as I would a petrol car and making no concessions.

The trip which could probably have been made comfortably with one stop in each direction, exactly as I would do in the frugal, family Ford Fiesta. The only thing preventing that today is not being able to count on chargers working as you could pumps at a filling station. I wasn’t alone, on the outbound trip a Jaguar I-Pace driver limped in having failed to charge at Knutsford further South. 

I learned a lot on the trip. One is that EV energy consumption is more sensitive to speed than conventional cars and range prediction less reliable. Another is that charging using the Ecotricity app is easy, convenient, relatively fast and fun, as long as the charger works. Including a few miles covered while I was there, I’d covered 694 miles, most of that in the two-way journey. 

Mass EV rollout around the corner?

The worst energy consumption I saw was 3.3 miles/kWh on motorways and the best, 4.0 miles/kWh in urban driving, or roughly 165 miles and 200 miles range respectively from 50kWh of capacity. During the whole trip. I stopped at eight DC rapid chargers and only two of them worked. 

I was left knowing that a Kona Electric 64kWh could comfortably make the trip with one stop each way especially once I got the hang of predicting the range more accurately. Affordable long-range EV technology has just about arrived although there’s still a premium over a conventional equivalent. The nearest is probably the Kona Premium SE 1.6 CRDi automatic costing £24,640, a difference of £10,505. 

That said, demand is outstripping supply for the Hyundai and other EV brands at the moment and one industry source I spoke to recently said that battery prices are dropping rapidly year on year. That being the case, the truly affordable EV from Hyundai, and others like Volkswagen with its ID, is literally around the corner. Let’s just hope the charging networks can keep up.

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Comments
73

6 January 2019

If demand is outstripping supply of EV Vehicles, then we have a problem. EV cars are improving and becoming more affordable - but the charging infrastructure? At a typical motorway services there may be 20 fuel pumps, mostly they all work and even at busy times when there may be one or two people in front of you, you are normally on your way in 5 to 10 minutes. Charging points? If this experience is anything to go by - sparse charging faclities, 75% not working - then as EV numbers increase queues will develop and having only 1 or 2 cars in the queue means a wait of hours.

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6 January 2019

It is not fair to associate the experience related in this story with all EVs. This is like someone making an LPG only internal combustion engine car, and inferring that it's difficult to find fuel stations that support it.

The Kona like BMW i3 and Jaguar IPace use the CCS Rapid charge connector. Why the EU invented this is beyond me really. 

The vast majority of Electric cars in the world are Nissan Leafs, with Teslas coming up fast. Tesla use their own proprietary connector, and Tesla invested very heavily in an excellent charge network. The Tesla Model 3 is coming to the UK soon, and will probably be cheaper than the Kona.

NIssan Leafs use the Japanese standard CHADEMO connector. In the UK the vast majority of rapid chargers are Tesla, then after this, there are more than three times as many CHADEMO chargers than CCS chargers. 

Nissan has some business affiliation with Ecotricity, so I think Nissan invested with them (the pumps often have "Nissan" written on them.

So at the moment I wouldn't buy anything other than a Tesla or a Nissan Leaf to get a motorway experience similar to conventionally fuelled cars. 

The other manufacturers see fit to make EVs but do NOT invest apparently in a charge network, presumably they are hoping they will take the profit, and someone else like government will pick up the tab for their charge network.

RE: practicality. The fact is that the US government, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the United Nations have all warned recently that we have 12 years left on current course before serious changes occur. In fact we've already seen global food production start to reduce. So driving a diesel/petrol forever is just not going to happen. Having said that I think petrol and diesel will still be cheap when all the food has gone. We are certainly already in the era of consequence.

However, an individual choosing to run an electric car at the moment does nothing for the environment. This is because it just makes diesel/petrol cheaper for others. So unless the government starts taxing carbon more meaningfully based on the actual damage that CO2 is doing, then nothing will actually improve. 

I've done quite a high mileage in a Nissan Leaf, mainly because it saved me money. I certainly could not live with a CCS car like the Kona or i3 or similar. Really it has to be a Leaf or Tesla for me based on the Rapid charge network infrastructure. I'd suggest that Terminalsecurity and other Auto magazines make a bigger thing of the rapid charge network coverage for the car they are driving. 

6 January 2019

I find it hard to take any of your points seriously when you state the Tesla Model 3 will 'probably be cheaper' than the Kona. In the uk at least this is a farcical suggestion.

8 January 2019

And we might have a zero tariff agreement with the USA. So far everything Tesla said they will do they've done. But I have no crystal ball. Perhaps "probably" is too strong, time will tell.

6 January 2019
Aruman 9000 wrote:

The other manufacturers see fit to make EVs but do NOT invest apparently in a charge network, presumably they are hoping they will take the profit, and someone else like government will pick up the tab for their charge network.

Manufacturers haven't had to invest in the current refueling infrastructure, I buy my diesel from Shell or Total or Texaco, not Ford or Hyundai or Renault, and it's an utter disgrace that all EV's cannot charge at all charging points, I don't have to seek out Diesel piumps with a special Hyundai compatible nozzle.

 

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6 January 2019
Aruman 9000 wrote:

The Tesla Model 3 is coming to the UK soon, and will probably be cheaper than the Kona.

Bwaahahahahaa!Sure, the ~280mile Tesla will cost less.   Sure it will.

Naah, you lost me at that nonsense, sorry!

7 January 2019
Aruman 9000 wrote:

 

RE: practicality. The fact is that the US government, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the United Nations have all warned recently that we have 12 years left on current course before serious changes occur. In fact we've already seen global food production start to reduce. So driving a diesel/petrol forever is just not going to happen. Having said that I think petrol and diesel will still be cheap when all the food has gone. We are certainly already in the era of consequence.

If what you quote is true, we should stop putting so much effort into swithing to electric cars, but instead outlaw fossil fuel heating systems for buildings. Nearly 50% of carbon emissions are produced by HVAC for buildings. Cars in comparison are a tiny proportion. Buildings could be switched to electric heating far more quickly and easily and could easily use up all electricity production we have in the process.

 

289

6 January 2019

....I mean really, this is a journey from hell. No one , unless certifiable, would pay a £10k premium for this level of aggravation and inconvenience.

And how do you access the app when driving....you will legally have to pull over and stop to check availability....not easy on a motorway!

I blame civil servants the world over for even considering allowing non compatible charging systems/plugs etc....its a nonesense - all EV's should be able to charge from all points. It ias totally wasteful and downright stupid to do anything else.

I visited Fleet services on the M3 the other day (not something I would usually do). Greeted by and endless row of Tesla chargers...natch with not one single Tesla hooked-up. Not a common sight on the road around here anyway, and all totally useless to anyone who hasnt spent a fortune on this over-hyped american trash. 

It beggars belief.

6 January 2019
289 wrote:

I visited Fleet services on the M3 the other day (not something I would usually do). Greeted by and endless row of Tesla chargers...natch with not one single Tesla hooked-up. Not a common sight on the road around here anyway, and all totally useless to anyone who hasnt spent a fortune on this over-hyped american trash. 

It beggars belief.

So an excess amount of changers is a negative thing? And you do realise that other manufacturers are allowed to use Tesla chargers... They just never accepted Teslas' offer.

289

6 January 2019

The answer to your question is Yes! especially when there is clearly little demand for them.

So few Teslas around here that I am not surprised...just taking up valuable parking spaces.

And it shouldnt be up to individual brands to decide type/shape/sharing of chargers. If there is global appetite to reduce emissions through EV use, then there should be a single global standard charging method....keep it simple to encourage take-up! Although, frankly, switching to EV merely poisons the planet in other ways.

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