Performance-focused Cooper S E will be first for the brand and the first all-electric hot hatchback on sale
Mark Tisshaw
8 January 2019

Mini’s first electric car will also be the industry’s first electric hot hatch, engineering sources in Germany have revealed.

Rather than a sole focus on economy and eking out range, Mini is developing its electric car with performance in mind. To that end, the model will be badged Cooper S E when it is unveiled later this year to reflect its performance hierarchy in the Mini range.

The Cooper S E will be based on the Mini three-door hatchback. That car’s UKL1 platform wasn’t originally designed with an all-electric model in mind, so has been adapted to accommodate the technology.

The BMW i3 S’s 181bhp electric motor is understood to be the most likely power source for the new Mini, meaning it will give little away to the 189bhp 2.0-litre engine of the Cooper S. The added weight of the batteries will be largely offset by the instant torque and lack of gears, meaning similar acceleration times.

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A range of around 200 miles from the car’s lithium-ion battery pack, which is also derived from the i3, is being quoted by insiders.

The reveal of the Cooper S E is the focus of Mini’s 60th anniversary celebrations, and the timing is key: Mini considers this anniversary the perfect time to launch such a forward looking car, and believes electric models are ideally suited to the brand’s image.

That’s not only because of how well-matched small EVs are to urban environments, but because of the performance characteristics of electric motors – in how they give instant responses and allow for greater control of each individual wheel. 

Mini previewed the EV with the 2017 Mini Electric concept, but the model is due to have much more in common visually with the Cooper S. To that end, expect styling similar to the regular Cooper S hatchback, with some electric ‘E’ trim to provide visual differentiation between Mini’s two hot hatches. After a reveal in the second half of the year, the Cooper S E will reach UK showrooms priced from around £30,000. 

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Comments
7

8 January 2019

Sounds like PR spin for an unremarkable car.

 

A 200 mile range is already well below what other manufacturers are offering, and the Mini won't even be able to take advantage of the packaging advantages that benefit electric cars.

I'd take a Zoe over one of these any day. Or, considering the pricing, a Kona.

 

 

8 January 2019

200 mile range is OK if the price reflects that this is mainly going to be an urban commuter car. The price does not reflect that.

8 January 2019

Even if it comes in at £30k, which is won't, it'll still be a fair bit more expensive than the much bigger LEAF, might even be more than the LEAF LR which is due to be reveled soon. 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 January 2019

... you wouldn't be seen dead in a Leaf, however much further its range. 

(btw, i'm in no way a Mini fanboy, think the 5-door is one of the worst designed cars in current existence)

 

 

You're not stuck in traffic - you are traffic!!

8 January 2019

I used the LEAF as a price comparrasion.  I bow to your superior knowledge of knowing all potential MINI EV's owners wouldn't be seen dead in a LEAF.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 January 2019

An i3S is £37k with 4 doors and carbon fibre tub , so perhaps they can do it for £30k as it's going to be far cheaper to build.

Leaf is a different catagory to a sporty hatch. 

8 January 2019

as sporty, and if its driven as such, I suspect the 200 mile range will be pure fantasy.. 

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