Performance-focused Cooper S E, Mini's first series electric car, has been spotted ahead of its late 2019 launch
Mark Tisshaw
28 May 2019

Mini’s first full-production electric car, the Mini Cooper S E, has been spied virtually undisguised during a photo shoot ahead of its launch later this year.

As first revealed by Terminalsecurity, the British brand's first battery-electric production model will be a Cooper-badged hot hatch, to reflect its performance heritage. It will be based on the Mini 3dr hatchback, with the 181bhp electric powertrain taken from the BMW i3.

Previously spied in a camouflage livery, the machine has now been captured during what appears to be an official photo shoot event in the US and confirms that the EV will closely follow the standard Mini design.

The biggest difference is the closed-off grille, a revised rear and new wheel designs. The photos also show that the charging port is set to be located in the same place as the fuel filler on the standard Mini. The images also show that Mini’s Union flag lights will remain in place on the EV.

The Mini three-door hatchback's UKL1 platform wasn’t originally designed with an all-electric model in mind, so has been adapted to accommodate the technology.

The BMW i3 S’s 181bhp electric motor will power the new Mini, meaning it will give little away to the 189bhp 2.0-litre engine of the Cooper S. The added weight of the batteries will be largely offset by the instant torque and lack of gears, meaning similar acceleration times.

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A range of around 200 miles from the car’s lithium-ion battery pack, which is also derived from the i3, is being quoted by insiders.

The unveiling of the Cooper S E is the focus of Mini’s 60th anniversary celebrations, and the timing is key: Mini considers this anniversary the perfect time to launch such a forward looking car and believes electric models are ideally suited to the brand’s image.

That’s not only because of how well-matched small EVs are to urban environments, but because of the performance characteristics of electric motors – in how they give instant responses and allow for greater control of each individual wheel. 

Mini previewed the EV with the 2017 Mini Electric concept, but the model is due to have much more in common visually with the Cooper S. To that end, expect styling similar to the regular Cooper S hatchback, with some electric ‘E’ trim to provide visual differentiation between Mini’s two hot hatches. After a reveal in the second half of the year, the Cooper S E will reach UK showrooms priced from around £30,000. 

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Comments
21

8 January 2019

Sounds like PR spin for an unremarkable car.

 

A 200 mile range is already well below what other manufacturers are offering, and the Mini won't even be able to take advantage of the packaging advantages that benefit electric cars.

I'd take a Zoe over one of these any day. Or, considering the pricing, a Kona.

 

 

28 May 2019
tuga wrote:

Sounds like PR spin for an unremarkable car.

 

A 200 mile range is already well below what other manufacturers are offering, and the Mini won't even be able to take advantage of the packaging advantages that benefit electric cars.

I'd take a Zoe over one of these any day. Or, considering the pricing, a Kona.

 

There are reliable reports that most ev owners travel less than 50 miles per day, so why must this car be maligned for offering something approaching 200. I would suggest that anyone who has this car in mind, would not consider a Zoe or a Kona as competitors. The modern MINI is a lifestyle choice, rather than a practical one, so little to no chance of one being bought as an only car by a family of five.

29 May 2019

The question is who actually NEEDS a bigger range?   

My own relatively extreme usage, circa 30000 miles per annum comprised of three 160 mile journeys a week two more days of short commutes and local shopping runs would indicate a range of 200 miles is more than adequate

A 200 mile range with the average private mileage () is less than one recharge a week. 

 

 

 

29 May 2019

And that reason isn't about -- need to take long trips. Rather, it would be about -- not needing to charge the car every day, i.e. be able like you can with petrol or diesel - drive normally every day for days - charging only at intervals. Because electric car onwership still is - relatively rare, i.e. not quite mainstream yet, even though it's heading mainstream. Most owners can charge at their front lawn. However, most people don't have front lawns - are likely to be unable to charge in front their residence, because they don't own a specific parking lot - and where they have to park, isn't in front of their apartment -- rather in some general parking lot, belonging to all inhabitants in general of that apartment building where you live. If you consider owners, that have to charge at all times - at available public charge lots; then significant range makes perfect sence - because you probably don't charge every day.

8 January 2019

200 mile range is OK if the price reflects that this is mainly going to be an urban commuter car. The price does not reflect that.

8 January 2019

Even if it comes in at £30k, which is won't, it'll still be a fair bit more expensive than the much bigger LEAF, might even be more than the LEAF LR which is due to be reveled soon. 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

28 May 2019
xxxx wrote:

Even if it comes in at £30k, which is won't, it'll still be a fair bit more expensive than the much bigger LEAF, might even be more than the LEAF LR which is due to be reveled soon. 

 

MINI EV as a direct competitor for the Leaf...

8 January 2019

... you wouldn't be seen dead in a Leaf, however much further its range. 

(btw, i'm in no way a Mini fanboy, think the 5-door is one of the worst designed cars in current existence)

 

 

You're not stuck in traffic - you are traffic!!

8 January 2019

I used the LEAF as a price comparrasion.  I bow to your superior knowledge of knowing all potential MINI EV's owners wouldn't be seen dead in a LEAF.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 January 2019

An i3S is £37k with 4 doors and carbon fibre tub , so perhaps they can do it for £30k as it's going to be far cheaper to build.

Leaf is a different catagory to a sporty hatch. 

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