Second iteration of Porsche's mid-size SUV will continue the brand's electrification strategy
28 February 2019
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Porsche’s second-generation Macan will switch to electric-only power when it’s launched in 2021 – but the company will continue to sell the existing petrol-powered first-generation model alongside it indefinitely.

In a move that will provide Porsche with both petrol combustion engine and pure electric versions of the Macan until well into the next decade, a decision has been made to extend the life of the first-generation Macan beyond the end of its planned model cycle.

“The petrol-engine Macan will continue to be produced alongside the new electric PPE-based Macan in Leipzig,” a senior spokesperson from Porsche’s Zuffenhausen headquarters in Stuttgart told Terminalsecurity.

Porsche won’t confirm how long the two models will be produced in parallel, adding: “There will be a transition time, but just how long that will be has not yet been determined.”

Porsche says the decision to extend the life of the existing Macan is due to concerns that some markets are not prepared for a sudden switch to pure electric drivetrains. 

“The move to a fully electric model line-up is suitable for certain markets but, due to a lack of infrastructure and other hurdles, it is yet not possible in other markets,” said Porsche. “We are constantly monitoring the situation and can react accordingly.” 

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The decision means petrol-engine versions of the next Macan will remain on the Audi-developed MLB platform, while the new pure electric version will use the PPE (Premium Platform Electric) architecture being developed in an engineering partnership between Porsche and Audi.

To provide the second generation line-up with a harmonious look, both the petrol-engine and electric models will adopt similar exterior and interior styling. The decision by Porsche to continue producing the combustion-engine version of the Macan despite plans for an all-new electric model is expected to be mirrored at its Volkswagen Group sister company Audi with the Q5.

Set for introduction in 2021, the second iteration of the firm’s mid-size SUV is set to become the third electric Porsche, following the Taycan due out later this year and the Taycan Sport Turismo estate, which is planned to go on sale in 2020. The firm had previously revealed that it was working on a battery-electric SUV.

No details have been made about the electric drivelines that will power the new Macan, but it's expected to receive a twin motor set-up and standard four-wheel drive, as planned for higher-end versions of the Taycan.

As with the existing facelifted version of the first-generation Macan on sale today, the electric SUV is set to be sold with a number of different power outputs in a multi-model range. 

Commenting on the decision to make the Macan an electric model, Porsche chairman Oliver Blume said: “Electromobility and Porsche go together perfectly, not just because they share a high-efficiency approach, but especially because of their sporty character.”

A development of the J1 platform used by the Taycan and Taycan Sport Turismo, the more flexible PPE platform has been conceived to support models with both low and high ground clearance, and with varying wheelbase and track widths.

A concept of the new Macan is expected to be shown this year, with rumours suggesting it may appear as soon as next week’s Geneva motor show.

In announcing plans to take the Macan electric, Porsche confirmed it will continue to be produced in Leipzig – a decision it says was taken in July 2018. This will mean electric models being produced on existing Porsche production lines for the first time.

The Taycan and Taycan Sport Turismo are planned to be produced on a dedicated production line currently being established at Porsche’s traditional Zuffenhausen manufacturing base on the outskirts of Stuttgart.

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19

26 February 2019

Looks like a direct attack on the I-Pace. Knowing Porsche, they'll probably get the edge too.

Not that that affects actual sales. You still see more F-Paces than Cayennes.

Jameson

26 February 2019
LJames wrote:

Looks like a direct attack on the I-Pace. Knowing Porsche, they'll probably get the edge too.

Not that that affects actual sales. You still see more F-Paces than Cayennes.

Depends on where you are. I see more Cayennes than F-Paces.

28 February 2019

Phew! I havent been taking electric cars seriously enough but the thought that some of these makes might ditch internal combustion altogether is frightening. Actually, I probably wouldn't care about the Macan. But the same isn't true for other models.

JMax

26 February 2019

Here's a case of the strongest brand with a better product range driving the market. Inevitably Terminalsecurity and its (many if not all) readers have a JLR fascination but i-Pace and the now-withering away F-Pace can't compete with the technology resources that VW/Porsche can put into the product. Porsche can likely move buyers from gen-1 Macan into the next-gen car because they liked the first car and the second will be different and - fast. Ford is pushing the Mustang-SUV's electric-drive step-off performance and it's smart. Rorty engines count for zip to 90% of SUV family man or women drivers and so Macan 2 is a good "walk" for people from the old car - startling step-off speed is fun in these cars because it seems improbable. 

Poor old JLR, with the I-Pace flat is now last in the US for reliability in the influential Consumer Reports and apparently having quality issues in Chinese-built models - I suspect it will really struggle. Porsche, like Apple often is, will be going in as a second-mover into the eSUV market and might clean up while poor first-moving Jag gets a bloody nose. 

26 February 2019

Surprized at that as it's only been there a couple of months and sold in the hundreds, is that a fair test? 

Also surprized it's worse than the Model X.  Please provide info!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 February 2019

Though oddly the US consumer reports I’ve just read gave it a pretty good ‘predicted’ rating and considers it the first real challenge to the Tesla X. https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/jaguar/i-pace/2019/ratings?pagestop

28 February 2019
sevensixty wrote:

Here's a case of the strongest brand with a better product range driving the market. Inevitably Terminalsecurity and its (many if not all) readers have a JLR fascination but i-Pace and the now-withering away F-Pace can't compete with the technology resources that VW/Porsche can put into the product. Porsche can likely move buyers from gen-1 Macan into the next-gen car because they liked the first car and the second will be different and - fast. Ford is pushing the Mustang-SUV's electric-drive step-off performance and it's smart. Rorty engines count for zip to 90% of SUV family man or women drivers and so Macan 2 is a good "walk" for people from the old car - startling step-off speed is fun in these cars because it seems improbable. 

Poor old JLR, with the I-Pace flat is now last in the US for reliability in the influential Consumer Reports and apparently having quality issues in Chinese-built models - I suspect it will really struggle. Porsche, like Apple often is, will be going in as a second-mover into the eSUV market and might clean up while poor first-moving Jag gets a bloody nose. 

 

That last paragraph makes no sense, what is an i pace flat? Its also built in Austria not China. Also given that the Audi etron is going to start at 71k the Taycan seems likely to be a fair bit more again, making it about 10k more than the entry level ipace.

26 February 2019

And just like that..... I am completely uninterested in the next-gen Macan. Shame because the current one is a very capable SUV.

I understand why they do it though, Diesel is on its way out and as the most sold car in their range it will make wonders for their CO2 fleet average to have it as a full EV.

26 February 2019

OK, I know this is a sweeping generalisation...but what the heck.  I can't remember the last time I saw a Macan on the road - they all seem to be in the station car park along with the Teslas.  I guess an electric-only powertrain works, even without a decent charging infrastucture, if you're only doing the station run...

26 February 2019

"only doing the station run" really? is that all BEV are capable of?

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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