Crossovers like the Mitsubishi Outlander – due to their popularity, size and manufacturer competition for a share of a rare growth market – have become the recipients of ever more stylish interiors in recent years.

Not that you’d know it by sitting in the Mitsubishi Outlander, however. Even if you opt for the range-topping model, with the full leather trim, glossy black dashboard inserts and metallic highlights, there is no disguising the wanton lack of imagination here. 

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Those seeking decent kit levels should opt for GX3 spec

Mitsubishi does at least provide a functional environment that’s easy to get to grips with. From the gated cul-de-sac of a gear selector to the extra-large buttons to disengage the parking sensors and traction control, the Outlander’s inner workings are instantly decipherable.

Things get a bit more fiddly when it comes to the slightly obtuse Multi Communication System (which is standard fit in GX5 trim models), but even here there are shortcut buttons to avoid any confusion.

The re-engineered third row of seats is similarly straight to the point. The 50/50 split sprung chairs (replacing the old bench) rise from their flush position in the boot floor at the prod of a lever.

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Thanks to the generous length of the load bay – 1.85m with both sets of seats folded – and 250mm of slide adjustment in the second row, legroom in the rearmost seats compares favourably with that of rivals. But they remain primarily seats for children.

Meanwhile, tall second-row occupants will find themselves comfortable only when the seatbacks are reclined slightly and their heads are parked in a cove cut into the roofline. With the third row folded away, there’s a 950mm-long load space, which translates into a competitive 591 litres of luggage capacity.

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